Building ResilienceEconomic Opportunities

Senegal: Feed the Future Senegal Kawolor Project

Project Profile

Kawolor Project

Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the Feed the Future Senegal Kawalor Project began November 2017 and will run through 2022, with the goal of reaching over 500,000 children under age five and their families with nutrition interventions. Kawalor means abundance in the local language Diola.

at a glance:

November 2017 – November 2022

funded by:
USAID
$40,000,000

Targets:

Households Targeted: 285,000

Stunting Reduction In Communities: -30%

Lives Impacted: 2.8 Million

Project Profile

Kawolor Project

Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the Feed the Future Senegal Kawalor Project began November 2017 and will run through 2022, with the goal of reaching over 500,000 children under age five and their families with nutrition interventions. Kawalor means abundance in the local language Diola.

Orange-flesh sweet potatoes were introduced to Senegal as part of Yaajeende’s focus on Nutrition-led Agriculture. Sweet potatoes are high in Vitamin A, a common nutrient deficiency in Senegal. Yaajeende’s community based nutrition classes educated community members on the benefits of eating sweet potatoes and how to cook them.

The project will focus on nutrition and will build on the foundation of Feed the Future Yaajeende, which among other impacts, reduced child stunting by 30 percent and poverty by 7 percent in 800 villages, lifting approximately 56,000 people above the poverty line, despite four years of recurrent drought and weather crises.

Moving into a “platform approach,” NCBA CLUSA will train and support local institutions to lead their own community development. This will allow communities to sustainably increase consumption of nutritious and safe diets, increase on-farm availability and market supply of diverse, micro-nutrient rich foods, increase resilience and income, increase adoption of nutrition and care practices and improve the governance of food systems in 3,500 villages across 150 communes in 10 regions—reaching 285,000 households and 2.8 million people over five years.

Key to this approach, NCBA CLUSA will partner with and strengthen local, regional and national private and public sector partnerships including Mother’s groups, Citizen Working Groups, Agriprenuers known as Community Based Solution Providers (CBSPs), private firms and research institutions.

A set of guiding principles—sustainability, empowerment, resilience, science and innovation, targeting of investments and coordination—are foundational to the project.

Highlight: Cultivert

Aissata Thilogme stands next to her LifeStraw Filter, which she uses to provide clean water to her community.

Tucked in the corner of Aissata Thilogme’s small store is her best-selling product—clean water. Not bottles, but bags and bags of filtered water for a fraction of the cost.

The store, a small room in a larger cement block building off the only main road through town, is nondescript except for the sign above the door—Nutrition Boutique. Inside sits a refrigerator, small table with bags of flour and a large LifeStraw Filter.

Aissata is a community based solution provider (CBSP) in the Matam Region of Senegal. Nominated by her community as part of NCBA CLUSA’s USAID|Yaajeende project, she is a local entrepreneur who provides access to essential items like seeds, enriched flour and clean water.

Before the community nominated Aissata as a CBSP, she was working as a nutrition volunteer, training mother’s groups on nutrition for themselves and their children. Continuing her training, now she can provide her mother’s groups access to healthy and nutritious products, making the training real and useful.

“The most important part of the business for me, apart from the LifeStraw, is the transformation of foods when I make flour and cookies,” Aissata said. Mothers were coming in to buy the naturally nutrient-rich flour, knowing it was more nutritious for their children. Before, they would have to travel to a larger town to access nutrient-dense cooking staples.

Aissata’s success over the past few years has grown her business. Identifying high-achieving CBSPs like Aissata, the USAID|Yaajeende project wanted to help standardize and market the healthy products across Senegal through a new brand—Cultivert. Aissata recently attended a Cultivert training to decide if she wants to invest in the model and expand her reach.

The Cultivert brand will be key to expanding the nutritious products access across Senegal with the Feed the Future Kawolor Project.

“Now everyone has access. Instead of importing from America things like seeds, or enriched flour, we can get them right here,” Aissata said. “We know how to not waste the product, we can make it into other foods like flour and use it for other products making it last longer. Now a bad harvest isn’t so risky.”

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